The Apollo Lunar Landings: A Video Archive

Now that 30 years have passed since man visited the moon IN PERSON, it has become somewhat less "real" to subsequent generations than it is to old folks like me, who got the privilege of staying up past my bedtime (by quite a few hours!) to see Neil Armstrong climb off the LEM and say those words that may now, to many, sound trite. But in 1969, (and really, even today!) it was the ultimate achievement of mankind. To think that they did it with 1960's technology (no laptops or like compact computers, or heat resistant tiles, or landing gear for easy touchdowns on Merritt Island (splashdowns only); no microchips; only wires, diodes, and very big (and very explosive!) rockets to get them out there) is all the more amazing.

However, there is an extensive video archive maintained at Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX of the Apollo missions and their results. What I've got here are video synopses of the Apollo missions, outlining (without excessive dramatization) what the missions did and how; along with a few "real" snippets of Lunar video footage for your viewing pleasure. All of these are mounted as streaming media resources on a USF server.

If your computer (IBM-PC or the like only for now - sorry Mac folks!) has a Local Area Network connection, or a cable modem connection, AND the plugin noted below loaded, you can play these on your own computer. Otherwise, you can watch them in the student-access computer labs on your campuses, where I've asked that this plugin be loaded. DO NOT try this off of a standard telephone modem - it won't work!

What do I want you to do? Watch a selection of the videos (Apollo 11, any one of the others, + the short video clips) and come ready to talk about them the next class session!


HOW TO RUN THE VIDEOS:

Note: Before attempting to view the videos below, you MUST download the plugin available here < http://bender.acomp.usf.edu/cgi-bin/pvod/g_download.cgi >

The plug-in works on Windows-based systems, ideally Windows 98 or later.


1) Open up Callisto <http://bender.acomp.usf.edu/

2) The login and password are input automatically - press Enter

3) When the Callisto main page comes up, choose the Sci-Tech option.  The various Apollo videos are listed here.  To run one, simply click on it

Most videos require 15 - 20 seconds to load. Please be patient.


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